Alright, I gotta get on here because bashing many for the actions of a few seems to be the trendy thing to do now. And recently, this trend seems centered like a magnifying glass on minoriites, and what certain ones do.

Let me explain something to all you people that want to come on here and write your "outraged" articles and rants about how minorities cry racism and can bring lawsuits for everything and are now getting better treatment because of what they went through in the past: YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHAT OUTRAGE IS.

Outrage is what I, and a majority of the minority population of this nation, feel when we read the same stories that you do.

Because when you turn on the news, or buy a newspaper, and read about a minority claiming he/she was discriminated against, or suing for bad treatment that they claim was racially motivated, you see an argument, an anecdote, a point that you can make. You see a story that you can read and be angry at. You see an example of reprehensible actions. Then, you are done with it. You can leave it alone and go on with your life. It does not have to affect you. You allow it to.

You want to know what I see when I read those stories? I see a beam coming down straight across my back. I see a sword coming for my head. I am Sysiphus, and I see that Goddamn rock slipping down the hill for the 2569405th time.

Because when I see that some woman has accused an elementary school of "setting up" her child, I can't be angry and be done with it. I can't sit back and call her an idiot and go on with my life the way it was, because she has cast a shadow on me. Every year that I have walked, trying to find sunlight and fertility and hope, this fool has eradicated with one sentence. One specific set of words out of this idiot's mouth, and all of a sudden the minorities are playing the race card again, because that's what they do. And I have another 100 miles to walk.

You think you get upset when you hear Jesse Jackson open his mouth? You don't know what upset is. Upset is what happens when you realize the percentage of people that think he speaks for you.

Upset is what happens when you realize that what you see as an idiot trying to sue Wendy's for millions of dollars is seen by everyone else as a Hispanic idiot trying to sue Wendy's for millions of dollars.

Upset is what happens when some idiot afraid of her marriage tells the police that she was kidnapped by a Hispanic man, or when a mother tired of her children tells them that a Black guy killed them.

That's when upset starts.

You read the stories too, and you think that it's not right, but you have never been angry like I have. You have never been angry like the minorities involved have. Because these stories come back to us. They never leave. They inhabit us. They stain us. They tattoo us.

They stay in the back of your mind, and maybe you let them go and don't think about them, but when you see us you remember. Maybe it's only for a split second, and maybe you shake your head, and maybe you give us the benefit of the doubt because you know that not all minorities are like that. But the thought is there, and without you thinking, before you catch yourself, its what springs forth.

It's the woman that instinctively clutches her handbag when a friend of mine approaches; He just wanted to know the time.

It's the man that crosses to the other side of the street when he sees a group of us approaching; We're on our way home from tutoring second graders.

It's the police officer who stops me from walking through an alley; I am less than a block from my house.

You have never been angry like I have. You don't know what it is to feel rage. Because rage is what sets in when you realize something:

A white person who does something stupid is a person who is stupid. An idiot. Just another idiot. A minority who does something stupid is a minority who did something stupid. A minority idiot. Just another minority idiot.

That is rage.

Rage is knowing that I am a minority, and so I am not free to be stupid.


Comments (Page 1)
on May 09, 2005
You have never been angry like I have. You don't know what it is to feel rage. Because rage is what sets in when you realize something: You assume too much! Otherwise, excellent post!
on May 09, 2005
You assume too much!


I just meant in regards to the situation at hand...I'm sure there is some anger somewhere that white people feel that I don't.

Otherwise, excellent post!


Thank you.
on May 09, 2005
Philomedy, I see examples of bad behavior all the time from every person of the racial rainbow. I do think to myself when someone uses the race card..is it true or is it false?
Sometimes I feel it is obvious in either direction, other times it is obfusicated and at that point I don't make a judgement. I can't say what any other human being on the planet thinks or feels about those issues until they voice their opinion..regardless of race.

A good question to ask though is why are white people becoming paranoid schizophrenics? Why? What reason do they have?.. Are they all born that way or taught that way in the public school system? IS there any truth to the madness?

Why do you continue to let someone elses actions brand you? Clearly your actions should set you way apart from the idiots..why does it affect you so? Intellectually speaking if someone mistreats you simply because of your race.. if you do not respond in kind by thinking racially motivated thoughts such as "That white person is scared cause I'm a minority".. then aren't you proving you're better than A) the idiot who's screaming out 'race inequality' and than the person who jumped across the street out of fear? Does the knowledge of your ability to get over it and not let it be an albatross around your neck comfort you.. or is it not good enough?

You play into the hands of racism and perpetuate it unknowingly by playing the game of "they're black, they must be criminals" and "They're white, they must think I'm a criminal"..People in general are complete idiots (of all stripes and color), rise above them..Teach others to rise above it, too. Allowing continued outrage, embarassment, and hostility to fester over these situations just distracts you from the real goal, to be better than pawns in the game..Anyone who helps perpetuate the racist propaganda IS a pawn, manipulated by true racists who are motivated by hatred.. Stop being a minority, mentally. It is JUST a statistic, do not allow it to be a state of mind. Too many people do so and behave in the stereotypical ways.

I refuse to be brushed as a paranoid racist simply because I'm white. I'm neither of those things and I know when I'm accused of being those things it is simply not true. Hopefully my actions prove it to others, but if not.. they're not worth it, anyways.

P.S. There are alot of human beings on this planet, never assume they cannot relate to your outrage or any emotion..Millions of people identify with it on a daily basis. And rage won't solve your problem, but it will make you hostile.
on May 09, 2005
A good question to ask though is why are white people becoming paranoid schizophrenics? Why? What reason do they have?.. Are they all born that way or taught that way in the public school system? IS there any truth to the madness?


They're taught by the media. Watch COPS. That's where it's learned.

Why do you continue to let someone elses actions brand you? Clearly your actions should set you way apart from the idiots..why does it affect you so? Intellectually speaking if someone mistreats you simply because of your race.. if you do not respond in kind by thinking racially motivated thoughts such as "That white person is scared cause I'm a minority".. then aren't you proving you're better than A) the idiot who's screaming out 'race inequality' and than the person who jumped across the street out of fear? Does the knowledge of your ability to get over it and not let it be an albatross around your neck comfort you.. or is it not good enough?


It affects me because the world throws it back in my face. Yes, my actions set me apart, but my actions are not immediately visible to the casual observer. And no, it's not good enough that I rise above it. It's not good enough because I know that I HAVE to rise above it. All of that "sticks and stones" garbage that they feed kids in school doesn't work in real life. In real life, what I do reflects on not only who I am, but what I am, and where I come from. As I said, in real life, I'm not free to be an stupid.

You play into the hands of racism and perpetuate it unknowingly by playing the game of "they're black, they must be criminals" and "They're white, they must think I'm a criminal"..People in general are complete idiots (of all stripes and color), rise above them..Teach others to rise above it, too. Allowing continued outrage, embarassment, and hostility to fester over these situations just distracts you from the real goal, to be better than pawns in the game..Anyone who helps perpetuate the racist propaganda IS a pawn, manipulated by true racists who are motivated by hatred.. Stop being a minority, mentally. It is JUST a statistic, do not allow it to be a state of mind. Too many people do so and behave in the stereotypical ways.


I never said blacks were criminals, and I never said whites think minorities criminals. This was about what I feel when I see minorities bringing unwarranted complaints based on flimsy claims of discrimination. I don't know what you mean by "stop being a minority, mentally." I am what I am; I'm not in the majority, so I'm a minority. You assume that being a "minority, mentally" is a bad thing. You assume that thinking of myself as a minority is somehow akin to self-degradation. That's precisely the kind of thinking that I'm trying to counteract here. I am a minority. Why can't I recognize that without being accused of holding myself down?

P.S. There are alot of human beings on this planet, never assume they cannot relate to your outrage or any emotion..Millions of people identify with it on a daily basis. And rage won't solve your problem, but it will make you hostile.


Again, I just don't think they (white people) can relate to my outrage about this specific subject. I'm sure they can relate to the level of outrage I feel.

on May 09, 2005
I'm one who has commented about racism among minorities, and while I appreciate your comments and perspective, I will continue to do so.

When I see a public high school in my state arrange for an day at Miller Park to see a Brewer's game, "for minorities only"; When I sit in what the Army laughingly calls an "Equal Opportunity" briefing, where a Sergeant Major (who is Black) stands there and tells me how minorities just never get a break in the Army; When, after an hour of CPR and Advance Cardiac Life Support on a young child, when the time of death is called and I just want to curl into a ball and cry my eyes out, I here the kid's father on already on the phone with a lawyer planning the racial discrimination lawsuit against everyone involved; I can't help but wonder why some minorities seem to live to perpetuate stereotypes.

That being said:

When I see General Powell, Condaleeza Rice, A boatload of nameless high ranking NCOs and Officers, CEOs, Fire Chiefs, Police Chiefs, Governors, Celebrities and highly motivated, highly successful people (who just happen to be "minorities"); Then I read your article about how outraged you are at the same things that outrage me; I feel a thrill of hope for the future.

Keep on speaking out! Not only because you see racial injustice comes in all flavors and colors, but because you see injustice!
on May 09, 2005
I'm one who has commented about racism among minorities, and while I appreciate your comments and perspective, I will continue to do so.


My article was not directed at any of your criticisms, but at those that overgeneralize. I've always found yours to be rather on-the-mark.

When I see a public high school in my state arrange for an day at Miller Park to see a Brewer's game, "for minorities only";


Same for me in high school, when my accounting class sponsored a field trip that only girls could go on.

I can't help but wonder why some minorities seem to live to perpetuate stereotypes.


I take issue with this sentence because I don't believe that they live to perpetuate anything. The stereotype is already there, and when a minority does something, then they're "perpetuating the stereotype." A white person does the same thing, and they're just being greedy, or trying to make a quick buck. The motivation is the same and the perception is different. The question is not why some minorities live to perpetuate a stereotype (which they don't), but why the stereotype is still there.

on May 09, 2005
Phil,

What I was driving at is that racism is but ONE brand of injustice; people who live a lifestyle of oppressing others won't confine their oppression to racial differences.
on May 09, 2005
Very good post! Intelligent and well said, for a minority idiot.

My neighborhood is perhaps 85-90% black, and I understand completely what you mean when you feel singled out. When I walk out of my house, I frequently get stares and such from my black neighbors who haven't met me, and wonder what Whitey is doing living so close to them, and intruding on their area.
I will often walk past a group of blacks, smile and nod, ask how it's going, whatever,and recieve silence in return. It works both ways.

Your article presents your views very well.
In my opinion, however,one of the problems comes from the way minorities portray themselves to the media and to society at large.
How many rappers (black or white, for that matter), for example, do you see smiling warmly out from the display windows of music stores? You don't. They all sneer and snarl threateningly, often making gang signs and perhaps other more anti-social gestures. Their personas as gangstas and Hos come through in their lyrics, which are often unnecessarily and ridiculously violent and sexually explict. This is supposed to reflect minority culture; in fact, I believe, it simply perpetuates the myth of it instead to society at large, while the more responsible members of those minorities (you, for example) seek to rise above it.

Minorities do it to themselves, and willingly at that, but I do get your point. Well written.
on May 09, 2005
I will often walk past a group of blacks, smile and nod, ask how it's going, whatever,and recieve silence in return. It works both ways.


True, although I wouldn't think the stares you get are as hostile as the ones I do. I could be wrong, of course.

How many rappers (black or white, for that matter), for example, do you see smiling warmly out from the display windows of music stores? You don't.


You don't see any rock stars smiling either, though.

They all sneer and snarl threateningly, often making gang signs and perhaps other more anti-social gestures.


Society has to stop thinking that these rappers are "gangstas," though. We must learn to differentiate between real gangbangers on the street and "studio gangstas" who are nothing but the products of record labels. This issue is addressed by a rather recent Terror Squad song, "Lean Back". One of its lyrics mentions how rap acts have "made gang signs commercial," and how they're being flashed by individuals who have no business claiming to know the lifestyle.

Their personas as gangstas and Hos come through in their lyrics, which are often unnecessarily and ridiculously violent and sexually explict. This is supposed to reflect minority culture; in fact, I believe, it simply perpetuates the myth of it to society at large instead, while the more responsible members of those minorities seek to rise above it.


People think it reflects minority culture because it's coming out of a minority's mouth, and thats what I don't understand. No one thinks Eminem reflects white culture. They think he reflects his experience growing up. Why isn't the same standard applied to minority rappers? Words are words, no matter how explicit they may be. Rappers just talk about it. On the other hand, look at the porn industry, which is mostly operated by white people. They're actually doing it!!! Why aren't they stigmatized as "ho's"? Look at the mob. Look at Chicago in the time of the CVL and the first Mayor Daley and the Irish-American "social clubs." Why hasn't this come back to haunt white people like the Latin Kings continue to haunt minorities?

Minorities do it to themselves, and willingly at that,


I don't think minorities are doing anything to themselves, I just think that what we do is perceived in the wrong way. I should be able to write a violent, sexually explicit story if I want to. I should be able to wear baggy clothing and a crooked hat if I want to. I should be able to exchange an elaborate, visually oriented greeting with my friends if I want to. And I should be able to do all of these things, and in fact profit from them, without someone telling me that I'm inviting observers to look down on me, and minorities in general.

but I do get your point. Well written.


Thank you.
on May 09, 2005

ParaTed said 'some' and you took exception to that statement.  Yet it is true.  And while 'some' of the minorities may just be willing accomplices of the so called leaders of the minorities, they do perpetuate the stereotype.  For the media will not write about the 90%+ that live every day lives like you and get harrassed (they will write about the harassment tho), they are quick to jump on every flimsy charge of racism. 

And so what do the rest of us have to look at? The Exceptions?  Sure but that is all the news most people get.

I dont see it as epidemic.  I do see it as playing the victim.  And that is not isolated to minorities, but then it is rare that you see a non-minority using the race card when playing victim.  But a minority playing a victim is sure to have that ace in their repetoire.

 

on May 09, 2005
The motivation is the same and the perception is different. The question is not why some minorities live to perpetuate a stereotype (which they don't), but why the stereotype is still there.


There's a lot of truth to that, although in the cases I cited above, each were racially motivated for their specific words or actions. If some minorities choose to behave that way, it is not racist for others to see it and conclude that SOME minorities act that way. It is self-evident. However it isn't any reason to think that ALL minorities (or even all members of any minority group) are "that way".
on May 09, 2005
philo, If I have ever said/printed something anything that cause you even a moments pain or discomfort I deeply apoligize. I mean no harm to anyone {well except crazy liberals} and that just generalzations.

elie
on May 09, 2005
ParaTed said 'some' and you took exception to that statement. Yet it is true


I don't think anyone gets up in the morning and says, "How can I perpetuate a stereotype today."

leaders of the minorities


How do you define them?

And so what do the rest of us have to look at? The Exceptions? Sure but that is all the news most people get.


Ignorance is not an excuse in this or any other case.

I do see it as playing the victim. And that is not isolated to minorities, but then it is rare that you see a non-minority using the race card when playing victim. But a minority playing a victim is sure to have that ace in their repetoire.


This is my point. I don't see why we can't just see all cases as a desperate person reaching for a lifeline.

on May 09, 2005
If some minorities choose to behave that way, it is not racist for others to see it and conclude that SOME minorities act that way


I don't think the conclusion is racist, but I don't think it is logical to assume that the aim was to perpetuate the stereotype.
on May 09, 2005
Very nicely written article Phil! There's nothing wrong in feeling the way you do. It's so easy for what you say here to be taken as an affront or for you to be told you're taking things too personnally, when you're not. The fact is if someone has never been at the receiving end of what you're talking about, they'll never understand the point you're trying to make.

Not all minorities play the victim card, not all minorities are the way how the media and other people typecast us. Unfortunately, the good suffer for the bad, and most times, we all get lumped together in one basket. Some might protest and say it's not true, but it's the reality of life.

While a majority of us don't go around with a chip on our shoulders, it is assumed that we do. Until our society stops seeing the color of someone's skin, or what ethnicity they're from, especially when it's not outwardly obvious, there will always be cause for rage.